Expat parents hit hard by soaring school fees

Published:  24 Feb at 6 PM
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Most expat parents living and working overseas do their best to get their children an international education, but the soaring costs of private school fees are becoming hard to meet.

A recent study by a leading expat bank has revealed that, however hard expat parents try to give their children the stability of a private school education, at least a third are being forced to consider removing them from their exclusive schools. Fees are believed to have risen by at least 25 per cent since 2009, and expat salary packages in general have decreased in real terms during the same period of time.

Only two per cent of parents who took part in the survey considered the fees when first enrolling their children in private schools, basing their decision on school facilities, good teaching in the English language and class sizes. Nowadays, 37 per cent are worried about meeting tuition costs and 57 per cent will have to give up if fees continue to rise.

According to the bank, 25 per cent of those surveyed are having serious problems affording the fees and are late payers as a result. Many with relatives still living in the UK are now considering cheaper options in the home country, and others are researching private education in boarding schools overseas.

Those living in developing economies where English isn’t spoken in local schools are facing the worst dilemmas, with home schooling perhaps the only solution until a return to the UK can be arranged. Cash help from family members or employers may be the only alternative solution.
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Comments » There are 2 comments

Elaine Lloyd wrote 5 years ago:

Ex pats with Non EU partners would have difficulty coming back to UK unless they have £62,500 in bank or the Brit has been living and working in UK for 6 months with minimum income of £18,600 if no children increasing to over £24,000 if one non British child., this arbitrary income threshold rule is splitting 1000's of children from a parent.

Elaine Lloyd wrote 5 years ago:

Ex pats with Non EU partners would have difficulty coming back to UK unless they have £62,500 in bank or the Brit has been living and working in UK for 6 months with minimum income of £18,600 if no children increasing to over £24,000 if one non British child., this arbitrary income threshold rule is splitting 1000's of children from a parent.

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